Evening Sun

evening sun
sinks behind tall grass
twilight creeps in

Pat R

3/08/16

This month on Carpe Diem Haiku we are exploring haiku writing techniques used by Basho. Our host writes:

“….In this haiku Basho uses the so called “sketch”or “shasei” technique….The poetic principle is “to depict the thing just as it is”. There are some inspirations for haiku that are best said as simply as possible. …it should never be the only method employed in a haiku….”

With the sketch technique you’re creating
“… a haiku depicting the thing just as it is…”

early autumn
the sea and rice fields
one green

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

how glorious
young green leaves
flash in the sun

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

For a more detailed read folliw this link

http://chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.com/2016/03/carpe-diem-933-rain.html?m=1

Tulips

amidst the wheat browns of winter
the first arrivals of spring
pointy ears of tulips

Pat R

3/08/16

This month on Carpe Diem Haiku we are exploring haiku writing techniques used by Basho. Our host writes:

“…This Haiku Writing Technique is called Narrowing Focus and it was used often by Buson (1716-1784)) because, he as an artist, a painter, was a very visual person. Basho and earlier poets were completely comfortable in using this haiku writing technique.
The poem starts basically with a wide-angle lens on the world in the 1st line, then switches to a normal lens for the 2nd line and zooms in for a close up in the end. The technique sounds simple, and when done well it’s very effective in bringing the reader’s attention down to one basic element or fact of the haiku..”

Examples of this technique:

old village
not a house without
a persimmon tree

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

a morning of snow
only the onions in the garden
blaze the trail

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

For Carpe Diem Haiku

http://chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.com/2016/03/carpe-diem-934-onions.html?m=1